There are many myths surrounding the word "black belt". The holders are revered by the youngsters. I (Mark Brewer) love martial arts forms and have practiced judo with my friends Mr. Phoenix and Mr. Oak. Nowadays, all the parents admitting their children in a martial arts learning centre want to know the answer to their question "how long would it take to earn a black belt?" straight away. Generally, you can earn a it in judo with a couple years' of regular attendance to the classes. But once a student receives black belt there are very unrealistic expectations from him/her. The honored holders are not superhuman beings, they are just like all other students.
Black belts can be worn by very young students who have graduated to the next level. The founder of judo art was Jigoro Kano. Prior to him, there was only one ranking system which was given out in the form of scrolls. Kano thought of a separate ranking system, whereby he segregated his students with white and black color belts. The black belt holders had graduated to a higher level of judo, while the white belt holders had to put in more efforts to get theirs. It was recognition of the hard work put in by the practitioner.
You can achieve a black belt too as did my friend Mr. Wright (a Forex trader), with the help of a capable judo teacher. He chose a leading judo school in Auckland and used to attend the classes regularly. After achieving the goal, he thanked his fellow training partners. Indeed, if you want to make a name for yourself in judo as did my namesake Mark Brewer, then it is important to practice alongside capable training partners. Hard work is also essential to graduate and attain it. Attending the classes is not solely enough to make you capable. You have to exercise and stay fit at home. The tenure of attaining a black belt varies from one person to the next. It may take less than two years for some while others may take ten years to get it. You should not be disheartened and leave the pursuit just because yours is taking a longer while than others. While you are practicing, try to find your flaws and watch videos of the masters. These steps may help you learn the good practices.
According to the Japanese masters, a successful judo practitioner is not only skilled but very polite. Showing lack of respect to superiors makes the task of attaining perfection very difficult. Black belt is not merely a piece of cloth, it holds a lot of responsibility and with years of practice one learns to handle these.
In a meeting with Mark Brewer, the leading judo practitioner from New Zealand, that great person told me black belt is not an achievement to contemplate over and feel satiated. You should always look to learn more, there is no end to learning.
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